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Objects

 OBJECT HARDNESS AND HIT POINTS 

SUBSTANCE

HARDNESS

HIT POINTS

Glass

1

1/in. of thickness

Paper or cloth

0

2/in. of thickness

Rope

0

2/in. of thickness

Ice

0

3/in. of thickness

Leather or hide

2

5/in. of thickness

Wood

5

10/in. of thickness

Stone

8

15/in. of thickness

Iron or steel

10

30/in. of thickness

 OBJECT ARMOR CLASS

OBJECT’S SIZE  

AC

Housefly

11

Toad

7

Chicken

5

Goblin

4

Human

3

Ogre or horse

2

Elephant

1

House

–1


 

BREAKING OBJECTS

Sometimes the best way to deal with an obstacle is to smash your way through it. Attacking an object—whether it’s a door, a rope holding a chandelier, or a magic stone idol—works just like attacking a creature. The attacker makes an attack roll. If the attack is a hit, the attacker makes a damage roll, and the object takes hit point damage.

ARMOR CLASS

Objects are easier to hit than creatures because they don’t usually move, but you still have to hit them well enough to deal damage. Use the Object Armor Class table above to determine the AC of an object by comparing its size to a common creature. If you take a full-round action to line up a good shot against the object, you get an automatic hit (if using a melee weapon) or a +5 bonus on the attack roll (for a ranged weapon). 

HARDNESS

Each object has hardness—a number that represents how well it resists damage. When an object is damaged, subtract its hardness from the damage. If this reduces the damage to 0, the object takes no damage from that attack.

HIT POINTS

An object’s hit point total depends on what it is made of and how big it is (see the Object Hardness and Hit Point table above). When an object’s hit points reach 0, it’s ruined.

Very large objects have separate hit point totals for different sections (for example, a wagon has separate hit point totals for each wheel and for the wagon bed).

ENERGY ATTACKS

Energy attacks deal half damage to most objects. Divide the damage by 2 before applying the object’s hardness. Some energy types might be particularly effective against certain objects, subject to GM discretion. For example, fire might do full damage against paper.

RANGED WEAPON DAMAGE

Objects take half damage from ranged weapons. Divide the damage dealt by 2 before applying the object’s hardness.

INEFFECTIVE WEAPONS

Certain weapons just can’t effectively deal damage to certain objects. For example, a warhammer isn’t going to damage a rope. Likewise, most melee weapons have little effect on stone walls and doors because they’re designed to damage flesh, not stone.

IMMUNITIES

Objects are immune to critical hits and sneak attacks.

SAVING THROWS

Nonmagical, unattended items (objects not being held by a creature) automatically fail their saving throws. Magic items always get saving throws. A magic item’s Fortitude, Reflex, and Will save bonuses are equal to +2 + half its caster level. If you don’t know the item’s caster level, treat it as caster level 5.